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Wednesday, December 16, 2009

Essential Oils for Christmas



If the aroma of pine is what brings back memories like going out and cutting your own tree, we have a top list of memory-joggers that you are going to love! With nature's essential oils, the aroma of Christmas need not be forgotten. Simply spray the tree with a mixture of 1 cup of water and 6 drops of essential oil of pine, or put a few drops of pine oil on an absorbent material and tuck around the base of the tree. Here are several essential oils that you may use to help re-create your Christmas memories.

Cinnamon (Cinnamoma cassia): Cinnamon comes from the dried bark of trees in the laurel family. Cinnamon has a rich history in Chinese medicine as well as Western herbal medicine. A holiday favorite, this dark scent is often used to accent cookies, cakes and cocoa. Cinnamon tea is not only delightful but helpful for relieving nausea and indigestion. Cinnamon oil is great for colds. Add a few drops of cinnamon oil to boiling water and inhale the steam. Cinnamon oil is also used as a massage oil and has a warming effect on skin.

Clove (Caryophyllum aromaticus): Clove is a hot oil. A holiday favorite, this delicious scent is often used in warming recipes. It can be used in a carrier oil for any infection. It has been used in the dental industry for years to deaden pain. Clove oil can be applied topically with a carrier. It has been used for arousing and fortifying. According to a study at the University of Iowa, compounds in clove oil have shown "strong activity" against bacteria associated with plaque and gum disease.

Pine (Pinus sylvestris) : Pine Needle was used by the ancient Romans and Greeks to treat respiratory problems and muscular aches. A holiday staple, this fantastic scent is often used to accent potpourri and diffused into the air. It promotes a healthy immune and musculoskeletal system. Distilled in Austria from the finest pines, Pine Needle can be diffused to help strengthen the respiratory tract and maintain sinus passages. When massaged into the skin, Pine Needle supports healthy circulation and soothes the discomfort of sore joints and muscles. A true disinfectant, a strong germ killer, excellent for viral infections and for muscular aches, rheumatism and arthritis.

Cedarwood (Cedrus atlantica), (Juniperus virginiana) : A holiday favorite, this fragrant scent is often used in accenting closets and cupboards. Cedar is a versatile oil that acts as an astringent and a cleansing agent. Believed to have originated from the famous Lebanon cedars, this essential oil provides an exhilarating tonic for the scalp and face to help the body deal with dandruff and acne. It can also be massaged into the skin for soothing, relaxing muscle rubs. Cedars are thought to offer longevity, and the oil it yields was used for embalming in ancient Egypt, and as an incense by Tibetan monks to aid in meditation.

Neroli (Citrus aurantium) : A holiday favorite, this rich citrus scent is often used in the scenting of perfumes. Neroli oil has a sweet, floral and slightly haunting aroma, the color is pale yellow and the viscosity is watery. This essential oil is also known as 'orange blossom' and it takes about 1000 lbs. of orange blossoms to make 1 lb. of Neroli oil.The name Neroli is said to originate from the Italian princess, Anne-Marie de la Tremoille, Countess of Nerola, who used the oil as a perfume and to scent her bathwater and gloves.The orange petals were used in China in the making of cosmetics and are still an ingredient for making traditional smelling Eau-de-cologne. Orange petals are often associated with marriage, purity and brides who traditionally wore it in their hair.

Sweet Orange (Citrus vulgaris) : The orange in itself is a highlight nutrias fruit containing many vitamins including A, B, and C. Being that essential oils are extracted directly from the peel of the orange, it contains all of these natural nutrients as well. This yellow-orange oil is quite sweet in fragrance and is used in “fruity” fragrance blends. Orange may also be used by itself for a light personal scent. Orange has been used as a beauty oil especially for the neck to help prevent and reduce the appearance of lines. Being that it is a citrus essential oil, it may cause irritation in people with sensitive skin.

Frankincense (Boswellia carterii) : Frankincense rejuvenates skin, so it's used on mature and aging complexions and to fade old scars, reduce inflammation, moisturize dry hair, and cure acne. A holiday favorite, this pungent scent is often associated with Christmas and is said to be one of the gifts of the Magi. Its antiseptic properties fight bacterial and fungal skin infections in a salve, lotion, or as a compress. It also treats infection of the lungs, the reproductive organs, and the urinary tract, and it increases the menstrual flow. the oil works in two ways to help the body fight infection and pain. It first numbs nerve endings to reduce the amount of pain sensations that reach the brain. And then it boosts the body's immune system to accelerate the healing process. As an added bonus, the oil's aroma relaxes the brain, which helps bring on sleep.

Myrrh (Commiphora myrrha) : Myrrh has been used since Biblical times to treat many ailments. A holiday favorite, this pungent scent is often associated with Christmas and is said to be one of the gifts of the Magi. It is a sap that dries into hard crystals. The sap is used by some for making tinctures. Myrrh is both antiseptic and astringent. It is used today as a mouth wash and used for treatment of mouth ulcers, sore throats and even for the relief of sore gums. To use it as a mouthwash, drop a few drops of the sap into a glass of water.

Peppermint (Mentha piperata) : Peppermint recalls the images of candy canes and sweet treats made from this wonderful oil. Peppermint has the powerful therapeutic ingredient menthol, as well as menthone, menthyl acetate and some 40 other compounds. Peppermint is a naturally occurring hybrid of spearmint (M. spicata) and water mint (M. aquatica). The oil is made by steam-distilling the plant's aromatic leaves and stems. Peppermint oil acts as a muscle relaxant, particularly in the digestive tract, reduces the inflammation of nasal passages and relieve muscle pains. A mixture of peppermint oil, eucalyptus oil and ethanol (ethyl alcohol) on the forehead and temples can reduce headache pain. Peppermint can be take as a tea, capsules or tinctures.

Andrew Pacholyk, MS. L.Ac
http://www.peaceful mind.com/ aromatherapy. htm
Therapies for healing
mind, body, spirit

Essential Oils for Christmas



If the aroma of pine is what brings back memories like going out and cutting your own tree, we have a top list of memory-joggers that you are going to love! With nature's essential oils, the aroma of Christmas need not be forgotten. Simply spray the tree with a mixture of 1 cup of water and 6 drops of essential oil of pine, or put a few drops of pine oil on an absorbent material and tuck around the base of the tree. Here are several essential oils that you may use to help re-create your Christmas memories.

Cinnamon (Cinnamoma cassia): Cinnamon comes from the dried bark of trees in the laurel family. Cinnamon has a rich history in Chinese medicine as well as Western herbal medicine. A holiday favorite, this dark scent is often used to accent cookies, cakes and cocoa. Cinnamon tea is not only delightful but helpful for relieving nausea and indigestion. Cinnamon oil is great for colds. Add a few drops of cinnamon oil to boiling water and inhale the steam. Cinnamon oil is also used as a massage oil and has a warming effect on skin.

Clove (Caryophyllum aromaticus): Clove is a hot oil. A holiday favorite, this delicious scent is often used in warming recipes. It can be used in a carrier oil for any infection. It has been used in the dental industry for years to deaden pain. Clove oil can be applied topically with a carrier. It has been used for arousing and fortifying. According to a study at the University of Iowa, compounds in clove oil have shown "strong activity" against bacteria associated with plaque and gum disease.

Pine (Pinus sylvestris) : Pine Needle was used by the ancient Romans and Greeks to treat respiratory problems and muscular aches. A holiday staple, this fantastic scent is often used to accent potpourri and diffused into the air. It promotes a healthy immune and musculoskeletal system. Distilled in Austria from the finest pines, Pine Needle can be diffused to help strengthen the respiratory tract and maintain sinus passages. When massaged into the skin, Pine Needle supports healthy circulation and soothes the discomfort of sore joints and muscles. A true disinfectant, a strong germ killer, excellent for viral infections and for muscular aches, rheumatism and arthritis.

Cedarwood (Cedrus atlantica), (Juniperus virginiana) : A holiday favorite, this fragrant scent is often used in accenting closets and cupboards. Cedar is a versatile oil that acts as an astringent and a cleansing agent. Believed to have originated from the famous Lebanon cedars, this essential oil provides an exhilarating tonic for the scalp and face to help the body deal with dandruff and acne. It can also be massaged into the skin for soothing, relaxing muscle rubs. Cedars are thought to offer longevity, and the oil it yields was used for embalming in ancient Egypt, and as an incense by Tibetan monks to aid in meditation.

Neroli (Citrus aurantium) : A holiday favorite, this rich citrus scent is often used in the scenting of perfumes. Neroli oil has a sweet, floral and slightly haunting aroma, the color is pale yellow and the viscosity is watery. This essential oil is also known as 'orange blossom' and it takes about 1000 lbs. of orange blossoms to make 1 lb. of Neroli oil.The name Neroli is said to originate from the Italian princess, Anne-Marie de la Tremoille, Countess of Nerola, who used the oil as a perfume and to scent her bathwater and gloves.The orange petals were used in China in the making of cosmetics and are still an ingredient for making traditional smelling Eau-de-cologne. Orange petals are often associated with marriage, purity and brides who traditionally wore it in their hair.

Sweet Orange (Citrus vulgaris) : The orange in itself is a highlight nutrias fruit containing many vitamins including A, B, and C. Being that essential oils are extracted directly from the peel of the orange, it contains all of these natural nutrients as well. This yellow-orange oil is quite sweet in fragrance and is used in “fruity” fragrance blends. Orange may also be used by itself for a light personal scent. Orange has been used as a beauty oil especially for the neck to help prevent and reduce the appearance of lines. Being that it is a citrus essential oil, it may cause irritation in people with sensitive skin.

Frankincense (Boswellia carterii) : Frankincense rejuvenates skin, so it's used on mature and aging complexions and to fade old scars, reduce inflammation, moisturize dry hair, and cure acne. A holiday favorite, this pungent scent is often associated with Christmas and is said to be one of the gifts of the Magi. Its antiseptic properties fight bacterial and fungal skin infections in a salve, lotion, or as a compress. It also treats infection of the lungs, the reproductive organs, and the urinary tract, and it increases the menstrual flow. the oil works in two ways to help the body fight infection and pain. It first numbs nerve endings to reduce the amount of pain sensations that reach the brain. And then it boosts the body's immune system to accelerate the healing process. As an added bonus, the oil's aroma relaxes the brain, which helps bring on sleep.

Myrrh (Commiphora myrrha) : Myrrh has been used since Biblical times to treat many ailments. A holiday favorite, this pungent scent is often associated with Christmas and is said to be one of the gifts of the Magi. It is a sap that dries into hard crystals. The sap is used by some for making tinctures. Myrrh is both antiseptic and astringent. It is used today as a mouth wash and used for treatment of mouth ulcers, sore throats and even for the relief of sore gums. To use it as a mouthwash, drop a few drops of the sap into a glass of water.

Peppermint (Mentha piperata) : Peppermint recalls the images of candy canes and sweet treats made from this wonderful oil. Peppermint has the powerful therapeutic ingredient menthol, as well as menthone, menthyl acetate and some 40 other compounds. Peppermint is a naturally occurring hybrid of spearmint (M. spicata) and water mint (M. aquatica). The oil is made by steam-distilling the plant's aromatic leaves and stems. Peppermint oil acts as a muscle relaxant, particularly in the digestive tract, reduces the inflammation of nasal passages and relieve muscle pains. A mixture of peppermint oil, eucalyptus oil and ethanol (ethyl alcohol) on the forehead and temples can reduce headache pain. Peppermint can be take as a tea, capsules or tinctures.

Andrew Pacholyk, MS. L.Ac
http://www.peaceful mind.com/ aromatherapy. htm
Therapies for healing
mind, body, spirit

Friday, October 30, 2009

Winter Herbs, Oils & First Aid


With the first winter chill breezing into town it's time to start thinking about how to keep the sneezes and sniffles away. While there's talk of the value of vitamin C, echinacea and garlic as natural treatments, herbalist claim herbs can prevent colds and flu. There are three main herbs, as well garlic, which are widely used to ward off winter woes. They are Echinacea, andrographis and astrolagus.

Echinacea
is effective for the early treatment of colds and flu because it's an immune stimulant but is best taken before a cold sets in, however, it can help shorten the duration of flu if you take it once you've become ill and can assist with treating respiratory infections.

Andrographis and Astrolagus work in much the same way. Andrographis is also used for coughs and sore throats. These herbs are highly effective alone or in conjunction.

The frequent use of Garlic, referred to as nature's antibiotic, puts you well on your way to preventing a winter cold.
And don’t forget your vitamin C. Citrus, grapes and strawberries are high in C, and it doesn’t hurt to add zinc from beans, nuts and whole grains.

You may wish to try this herbal remedy, shared by a friend who swears by it. She hasn’t had a cold/flu in years.
Total Tonic Formula
1 Handful of split Garlic cloves
1 Handful of chopped Onions
1 Handful of chopped Ginger
1 Handful of chopped Horseradish
1/2 handful of chopped Habanero Peppers.

Throw in a blender and chop, then cover with
an inch or two of Organic Apple Cider Vinegar.
Let tincture for a week or two (shake now and then)
and strain, then drink a little of the juice daily,
or twice daily. (It is very HOT)
A small amount in V8 Juice is good and Turmeric can be added for extra benefit.

Winter Herbal Medicine Chest
Several herbs are effective for treating not only the symptoms of too much winter, but also the causes of colds and flu… Impaired immunity to virus/bacteria, maintaining blood circulation and warmth, ensuring vitality of the lungs and reducing the build up of congestion in the body. In addition to the herbs already mentioned, some herbs to keep on hand in your “medicine chest” are:
Ginger, Elderflower, Yarrow, Sage, Rose Hips, Mullein, Thyme, Fenugreek & Marshmallow.

Other beneficial ingredients to your chest would be
Winter Essential Oils
Aromatherapy brings us the aromatic energy of living plants in the form of essential oils. These fragrances are a natural antidote to the emotionally debilitating effects of winter. Winter essential oils cleanse and freshen air in homes closed tight against the cold weather and can be beneficial in treating winter ailments. Some useful winter oils are:
Bergamot, Black Pepper, Eucalyptus, Juniper Berry, Lemon, Orange, Rosemary & Tea Tree.

Try these Essential Oil remedies in a massage, a bath, infused in the air or in a “sniffy” bottle. In all of them combine the oils listed.
WINTER WARMTH BLEND
10 drops of cedar wood
25 drops of bergamot orange
15 drops of fir needle
30 drops of juniper berry
20 drops of sandalwood
SINUS CONGESTION BLEND
5 drops of Eucalyptus
3 drops of Lavender
2 drops of Tea-Tree
2 drops of Pine.
PICK ME UP BLEND
7 drops of Bergamot
5 drops of Grapefruit
3 drops of Rosemary
SUNSHINE BLEND
5 drops of Lemon
5 drops of Orange
3 drops of Geranium
2 drops of Peppermint

Wednesday, October 28, 2009

Traditional Herbal Medicine Under Threat

www.cropwatch.org
THE FIRST TRULY INDEPENDENT WATCHDOG FOR THOSE
WORKING WITH NATURAL AROMATIC MATERIALS
E: info@cropwatch.org T: ++44 (0)7771 872 521
Traditional Herbal Medicine Under Threat.
The purpose of this Cropwatch emergency mailing is primarily to ask
all of you to seriously consider signing the Save Our Herbs petition at
http://www.gopetition.com/petitions/support-herbal-medicine.html This
organisation not only campaigns on behalf of the general public, but
also represents a very significant proportion of medical herbalists of
both Eastern and Western traditions, practising in the UK.
Time is very short - if you want to support this very worthy campaign
ensuring the continued availability of safe Herbal Medicinal Products,
the continued free use of a wide range of our safe endemic &
imported Herbs by ordinary people according to our traditions,
preventing the takeover of small Herbal Medicine Suppliers by
pharmaceutical concerns, & opposition to Statutory Regulation of
Herbalists, you will need to sign the petition by 31st October 2009.
The Save Our Herbs campaign’s official website can be found at
http://www.saveourherbs.org.uk/index.html and provides a wealth of
background information to this potential crisis for Herbal Medicine.
Cropwatch strongly recommends you to read through the
comprehensive information to be found there.
Cropwatch’s Own View.
There are a number of inevitable consequences for Traditional Herbal
Medicine as a result of the implementation of the EU Commission’s
Traditional Herbal Medicinal Products Directive 2004/24/EC, which
came into force on 30th April 2004.
§1. Traditional Herbal Medicinal Products (THMP’s). All THMP’s
placed on the market post the implementation date of the new EU
2
legislation, must have a national authorisation to be marketed, and
whilst several EU member countries have had national schemes in
place, the UK has previously enjoyed a virtually unregulated market.
In the UK, for products already on the market prior to the introduction
of this legislation, marketing concerns have until 30th April 2011 to
obtain authorisation (from the Medicines and Healthcare products
Regulatory Agency - MHRA) and to work to GMP. The MHRA’s
Traditional Herbal Registration Scheme, and its relative lack of
uptake – undoubtedly due to the excessive costs involved (as shown
by the low cumulative total of THR registrations) can be viewed at
http://www.mhra.gov.uk/Howweregulate/Medicines/Herbalmedicines/
PlacingaherbalmedicineontheUKmarket/TraditionalHerbalMedicinesR
egistrationScheme/index.htm As we have witnessed in other seento-
fail & discriminatory areas of EU legislation (that pertaining to
Biocides regulation for example), unnecessary, over-intrusive and
crippling financial burdens are placed on the SME’s which market
natural products, a situation which plays straight into the hands of the
pharmaceutical / chemical companies. It should also be remembered
that the MHRA themselves have been severely criticised as being too
close to the pharmaceutical industry (e.g. in House of Commons
Health Committee Report (2005) entitled ‘The Influence of the
Pharmaceutical Industry’:
“A House of Commons Health Committee Report from 2005, entitled
‘The Influence of the Pharmaceutical Industry’ is highly critical of the
MHRA and its close relationship with the pharmaceutical industry. It
states, ‘(t)here are regular interchanges of staff, common policy
objectives, agreed processes, shared perspectives and routine contact
and consultation. Many of the senior staff of the MHRA have previously
worked with the industry …’1 It is therefore doubtful whether the
MHRA can be trusted to serve the best interests of herbal
medicines, herbalists and their patients”.
For a breakdown of expected MHRA fees for THMP’s, please refer to
a document drawn up by Dave Blackwell of Herbs4Healing Ltd. under
Appendix A at the end of this document, and reproduced with his kind
permission.
§2. The Possible Illegality of Actions by Regulatory Officials Meddling
with the Free Availability of Natural Remedies in the UK.
The UK differs from other European Member States, since there has
long been a legal recognition of Herbal Practitioners, dating back to
3
Henry VIII’s Charter, which defines a Herbalist and the right to
practice & minister:
Common Law set down by Henry VIII defines a herbalist '…henceforth it
shall be lawful to every Person being the King's subject. having
Knowledge and Experience of the Nature of Herbs, Roots, and Waters,
or of the Operation of the same, by Speculation or Practice, within any
part of the Realm of England, or within any other the King's Dominions,
to practice, use, and minister in…'
(see Watt 2009: http://www.aromamedical.com/articles/traditionalherbalists.
htm, reproduced by kind permission). Cropwatch
understands this Charter has never been repealed.
It should also be remembered that there is a clause in the Treaty of
Rome of 25th March 1957 which can be interpreted as preventing
interference with the availability of natural remedies: “2. The Union
shall respect fundamental rights, as guaranteed by the European
Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental
Freedoms signed in Rome on 4 November 1950 and as they result
from the constitutional traditions common to the Member States, as
general principles of Community law.” Watt (2001) discusses the
validity of the above argument and further protections of natural
remedies afforded by other clauses in the Treaty of Rome at
http://www.aromamedical.com/articles/mlx249.html (scroll down to
“Controls on Natural Remedies.”
The interference with free availability of natural herbs and medicines
also impacts on religious freedom & worship and use of herbs in both
the Islamic and Judaeo-Christian traditions. Cropwatch understands
that representations to Ministers / MP’s by a delegation representing
views of individual members of the Islamic and Christian faiths
respectively, are in progress, in order to avert any possibility of the
prospect of religious or cultural discrimination by the regulatory
authorities.
§3. Statutory Regulation of (the Title & Function of) Herbalists.
A Consultation Document was published by the Department of Health
(DH) of the UK Government on 3rd August 2009: A joint consultation
on the Report to Ministers from the DH Steering Group on the
Statutory Regulation of Practitioners of Acupuncture, Herbal
Medicine, Traditional Chinese Medicine and Other Traditional
4
Medicine Systems Practised in the UK. The consultation period ends
on 3rd Nov 2009. The Save Our Herbs campaign has produced a
draft response to the consultation at
http://www.saveourherbs.org.uk/files/Download/Response%20To%20
Consultation%20Document.pdf which Cropwatch strongly
recommends you read.
We are told by the Department of Health (DH) that the purpose of
Statutory Regulation (SR) is / was to safeguard public safety but
many herbal practitioners would maintain that this is a nonsense,
since existing self-regulation is already proven adequate. The Pitillo
Report (see below) further states: “Statutory regulation can more
effectively assure the standards of those regulated, protecting the
public from poor or bad practice, because legal sanctions exist to
remove individuals from a register. Statutory regulatory bodies
determine standards of practice and competence.” But as Cropwatch
pointed out in 2008, CAM is not the issue. The UK-based inquiry
started in 2000, decided that the medical practitioner Dr Harold
Shipman allegedly killed up to 250 of his patients, some 218 of whom
have been subsequently identified. Similarly the confidence &
assurance in health officials supposedly assured by regulation did not
help the victims of Nurse Beverly Allit, knicknamed the ‘Angel of
Death’ by the popular press. Health care authorities had to
subsequently carry out heavy modifications to medical practice,
belatedly increasing patient protection. Conversely, we are not aware
that any practicing Herbalist has killed or injured anybody in the UK
(an MHPRA document (July 2008) “Public Health Risks with Herbal
Medicine: An Overview” only identified (only) a single major incident,
in a Belgian slimming clinic, where an irresponsibly prescribed herb of
the Aristolochia spp. resulted in 100 women developing kidney failure
many of whom allegedly went on to develop cancer). Further, in spite
of 22 million annual visits to herbalists in the UK (Thomas et al. 2001
thro’ The Pitillo Report) and with one in three US citizens taking
herbal medicines on a regular basis, no safety assessment of herbal
medicine has ever taken place, either in the UK or at an international
level. Attempts to demonize widely used herbal medicines such as St.
Johns Wort Hypericum perforatum by the pharmaceutical industry,
pale into insignificance when it is realised that the herbal drug has
been found to be as effective as major conventional synthetic antidepressants,
and to have fewer side-effects (Linde et al (2008)
5
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 8 (4)). In conclusion, under the
government's own protocol, before Statutory Regulation can be
established, a risk assessment tool for herbal medicine would have to
be established, and no such assessment tool exists. There is also a
requirement for an established knowledgebase to be in place, and
this is also not established.
On the other hand, with regard to conventional medicine, for some
curious reason we hear relatively little in the media about the
statistics surrounding the failure of MD's working in the National
Health Service (NHS) to correctly diagnose & prescribe the
appropriate treatment for a given patient's ills (a major concern). The
British Medical Journal (BMJ) Evidence Centre at
http://clinicalevidence.bmj.com/ceweb/about/knowledge.jsp reveals
that of around 2500 [commonly used NHS] treatments covered, 13%
are rated as beneficial, 23% likely to be beneficial, 8% as trade off
between benefits and harms, 6% unlikely to be beneficial, 4% likely to
be ineffective or harmful, and 46%, the largest proportion, as
unknown effectiveness.
Further, tens of thousands of patients die or suffer serious sideeffects
from certain prescribed (and by now, notorious)
pharmaceuticals. It has been admitted that in the decade up to the
year 2007, 80,000 patients had died from iatrogenic disease and that
a further £46 million had been spent by the NHS on treating the
survivors. Since that time reports have been issued that this state of
affairs has further deteriorated, in part blaming the increasingly
complex MHRA approved drug regimes employed. By comparison,
those therapies now being attacked with the threat of regulation are
becoming ever increasingly safer! (Information provided by Robert
Scott).
Finally, let us turn to the darkly hilarious but thorough reporting of an
extensive study by the Union of Concerned Scientists to the effect
that embarking on a course of conventional drug treatment appears
to statistically increase the chances of shortening your life. This is
quite aside from the serious chances of dying or losing limbs from
hospital acquired infections, or recent media reports of lack of care &
attention and even cruelty shown towards elderly NHS patients. Yes,
the conventional medical profession / NHS is in serious need of
effective statutory regulation, whereas any need for increased
6
regulation of CAM is, by comparison, not only completely
disproportionate to the degree of health risk posed, but, is essentially,
nothing but a sideshow, and a waste of taxpayers money.
4. The Government Reconsiders the Need for Statutory Regulation.
There are some strong signs that the Government is re-examining
any need for the imposition of Statutory Regulation (SR) of Herbalists
whatsoever (in spite of a House of Lords Select Committee
recommendation and the recommendation of three DH working
groups in favour of SR). At the same time they are apparently
reconsidering any need and the practicality of changes to the 1968
Medicines Act Section 12.1 (bear with us: this is an exemption from
various medicines licensing requirements in the Medicines Act which
allows herbal practitioners to prepare or obtain from a third party,
unlicensed herbal medicines to meet individual patient needs
identified in a consultation). Instead some reports indicate that they
are considering a less severe licensing system, perhaps based more
around self-regulation or self-licensing. This follows the publication of
the Report to Ministers from The Department of Health Steering
Group on the Statutory Regulation of Practitioners of Acupuncture,
Herbal Medicine, Traditional Chinese Medicine and Other Traditional
Medicine Systems Practised in the UK May 2008 (‘The Pitillo Report’)
which can be accessed by following links from
(www.dh.gov.uk/en/consultations/liveconsultations/DH_103567).
However, one of the recommendations of the above report is that
Herbal Medicine, Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine
(TCM) should come under statutory regulation by the Health
Professionals Council (HPC), a body totally unsuited to the task.
It was pointed out by Robert Scott in a letter to the Health Authorities
(seen by Cropwatch), that the proposal to regulate Herbal Medicine
by Mr. Marc Seale, registrar of the HPC, was made after aggressive
lobbying by the chairman (a certain Mr. Michael McIntyre) of the
European Herbal Traditional Practitioners Association (EHTPA) who
sat as one of three stakeholders on the committee chaired by
Professor Pittilo mentioned above. The recommendation to ‘strategy
regulate’ was originally sent by Marc Seale to Alan Johnson in his
role as the previous Secretary of State, although we believe the
matter was handled by Ben Bradshaw a junior Minister of State at the
Department of Health. It appears that both these gentlemen have
7
now been transferred to different departments. But to quote from the
letter mentioned above:
“The chairman of the EHTPA, by his own admission, had a major
influence on the Pittilo report. As he is also closely associated with
the National Institute of Medical Herbalists (NIMH), this establishes a
somewhat troublesome incestuous link between these organisations,
which jeopardises the integrity of the final report.
Although the EHTPA likes to put forward that its stance in favour of
statutory regulation is supported by the majority of practising
herbalists, this claim is not supported by their voting record. The
largest body within the EHTPA certainly is NIMH, but only a
ridiculously small amount of its membership actually voted in support
of this move. The vast majority either abstained or voted against.
The membership of the Unified Register of Herbal Practitioners,
another organisation that is a member of the EHTPA, was threatened
with expulsion from their professional register if they voted against
this proposition.
The lack of support for statutory regulation from the membership of
URHP had even been acknowledged in writing by the chairman of the
EHTPA.”
These extracts seen by Cropwatch only touch the tip of the iceberg
regarding the political manoeuvring and ‘behind the scenes’ power
games invisible to the hapless regulatory officials who are only
served up selected titbits by those players who would seek to control
the direction of the regulation of Herbal Medicine. If Cropwatch can
find the time, we may open this can of worms further and dissect the
odious contents a little later on.
As you can gather then, the basis of the HPC’s support for Statutory
Regulation based on the recommendations of the above report is
therefore totally undermined – not only has it failed to take into
consideration the unique character of Traditional Herbal Medicine but
it is also in danger of acting contrary to the principles of the Islamic &
Judaeo-Christian religions (see §2 above).
Thanks to Martin Watt & Robert Scott for kind permission to include
their material.
8
Appendix A – by kind permission of David Blackwell.
CRITIQUE OF THMPD AND ITS IMPLEMENTATION IN THE UK
The latest information and detailed explanation on costs are attached.
Dried Herbs and simple Tinctures (Reduced categories I and II)
Many herbal suppliers currently offer a wide range of dried herbs or tinctures for
direct sale to the public (e.g. Baldwins and many internet shops). The fee per
item (£577 - £864 every 3 years) plus other costs such as inspection and
preparation of dossiers will mean that many raw herbs and simple tinctures will
cease to be available to the public. The costs are considerably higher where a
herb has not previously been included in a product which has been granted a MA
or THR, which the vast majority in the western herbal pharmacopoeia have not.
In this case the fees rise to an eye-watering £5,185 per herb/tincture. Each
different preparation requires a THR. This means that if you supply a single herb
as a dried herb (tea), powder, capsules, tinctures of different strengths, alcoholfree
extracts, fluid extracts, infused oils and essential oils, plus the organic
versions if marketed separately, each would require a separate application. For
example Baldwins currently offer in the region of 550 products of which between
10-15% will be considered for the Reduced categories, while the rest will be
Complex i.e new registrations. This adds up to an estimated £2,600,000 initially
then £360,000 every 3 years thereafter.
This is a very unfair system, since the first to apply for a previously unregistered
product will have to pay the full cost (Complex), while subsequent applications
will fall into the Reduced category.
Herbal Remedies (Reduced categories I and II) - usually referred to as
Complexes, but this term is avoided to avoid confusion with the THR category
In theory this applies in a similar manner as for simples (above), but in most
cases will be subject to higher fees if there are more than 3 ingredients, ranging
from £864 for teas to £1,297 for other preparations and £7,7791 for previously
unregistered ingredients. However Herbs Hands Healing have been told that it
will not be possible to register very complex products and to consider issuing
them as kits containing all the ingredients separately. The MHRA Public
Assessment Reports reveal that where a product includes 2 or more active
ingredients genotoxicity data will need to be provided, at least by the time the
registration has to be renewed. EC genotoxicity testing involves expensive in
vitro and in vivo (live animal) procedures. The assumption here is that
combinations of herbs pose a significantly elevated risk and ignores the long
history of herb combining and the lack of evidence to suggest that a potential
problem exists. If we compare hospitalizations and deaths through food
1 Applies to combinations of 2 or more ingredients
9
consumption (e.g. allergic reactions and food poisoning together with the health
risks of long term poor food choices) with that arising from the use of herbs, it is
clear that food is far more dangerous. Yet it is ludicrous to imagine a time when
a simple aubergine bake in tomato sauce with oregano, black pepper, salt and
topped with cheese could be subjected to similar concerns and regulations, but
here it is happening with herbal medicines. Also we are well aware of the
limitations of such testing when it comes to protecting the public from
unforeseen adverse effects, as has happened with many pharmaceuticals.
It is anticipated that most specialist herbal suppliers, which can be classed as
small to medium businesses, will be unable to finance the registration of their
existing range of products and those consulted have come to the conclusion that
they will have to wind up their businesses.
Oriental and other World Herbs
Many products will fall foul of the 15 year rule. This includes complex products
and herbs from traditions such as Ayurveda and Unani-Tibb, which have no longestablished
OTC history in the EC. TCM products are more widely available in the
UK and tend towards traditional i.e. fixed formulations, however it may still be
difficult to establish 15 years use in many instances. Furthermore the “applicant
and registration holder must be established in the Community”, meaning that the
onus falls upon importers to arrange THRs. This means that ethnic communities
and those who show a preference for oriental medicines are likely to be more
disadvantaged by the new rules.
Potential Outcomes
The regulations will undoubtedly change the face of herbal medicine within the
UK. It is anticipated that there will be an upsurge in the marketing of a small
range of commercially viable herbal products; those that have entered the wider
public consciousness and which have gained a reputation as being cures for
certain conditions. Examples would be Black Cohosh for the menopause,
Feverfew for migraines, Valerian for stress, Echinacea for colds etc. Other herbal
ingredients and remedies are likely to disappear from the nation’s shelves or be
drastically reduced in range. There will be a shift in public perception of herbal
medicine towards a more pharmaceutical model where herbs are treated as
drugs for specific conditions rather than to treat individual symptom patterns.
THMPD will also enable mass marketing of products and will usher in a transition
towards supermarkets and chemists as the primary outlets.
Many existing businesses will be severely impacted by the new regulations
(wholesalers, manufacturers and retailers) and it is envisaged that many will
close as a result, either as April 2011 arrives in the following 3-5 years. The
impact of this restructuring of the herbal industry will be felt by herbal
practitioners in 2 ways. Firstly the increased demand for certain ‘popular’ herbs
10
and the buying power of larger corporations will lead to an inevitable price rise
and possible supply problems for these. Secondly, the contraction in demand for
other less popular herbs due to the closure of businesses may see a reduction in
the range stocked by wholesalers. It is impossible to foresee the full
consequences of this, just as no one predicted the sharp rise in world food prices
and shortages caused by biofuel production.
The effects could be devastating. Without wishing to be alarmist, the vast
majority of small to medium UK herbal businesses could rapidly disappear,
leaving many unemployed. Pharmaceutical companies, Chemists and
Supermarkets will gain from increased freedom to market products and will no
doubt increase their market share and profits. It’s somewhat akin to selling
mineral and timber extraction rights in the Amazon; the big conglomerates move
in and extract everything of value, leaving behind cultural and environmental
devastation.
The system is unwieldy, expensive, overly bureaucratic and unnecessary. If
anyone truly believes this will protect the public, they are sadly mistaken. There
is simply no evidence that there is any significant health risk to be protected
from, plus it will be impossible to prevent internet purchases from abroad,
thereby creating an uncontrolled marketplace where before there were
responsible UK companies who were subject to regulation.
MHRA Charges for THMPD Registration, not including site inspections,
stability testing, genotoxicity testing or other miscellaneous costs
CATEGORY
£
FEE
Standard
All products unless Reduced or Complex
3 or fewer existing herbal active ingredients 2,593
More than 3 existing herbal active ingredients 3,890
Reduced
Category I
Herbal teas, excluding ingredients not previously registered*
3 or fewer existing herbal active ingredients 577
More than 3 existing herbal active ingredients 864
Category II
Tinctures, Essential Oils, Oils, or Capsules, excluding ingredients not
previously registered*
3 or fewer existing herbal active ingredients 864
More than 3 existing herbal active ingredients 1,297
Complex*
Applies where an active ingredient has not previously been included in a
11
medicinal product which has been granted a MA or THR
Single new herbal active ingredient 5,185
2 or more new herbal active ingredients 7,779
The definitions for fees categories are as follows:
"Reduced registration application category I" means an application other
than a complex registration application for a traditional herbal registration
relating to a medicinal product which is presented in the form of a herbal tea;
"Reduced registration application category II" means an application, other
than a complex registration application, or a traditional herbal registration where
the application falls within one of the descriptions specified in sub-paragraphs (a)
to (d) as follows -
(a) the application relates to a medicinal product which is presented in the form
of a herbal tincture;
(b) the application relates to a medicinal product which is presented in the form
of an essential oil;
(c) the application relates to a medicinal product which is presented in the form
of a fatty oil; or
(d) the application relates to a medicinal product which contains only herbal
substances in a capsule;
"Standard registration application" means any application for the grant of a
traditional herbal registration which is not a complex registration application, a
reduced application category I, a reduced registration application category II or a
change of ownership application;
"Complex registration application" means an application for a traditional
herbal registration relating to a medicinal product containing an active ingredient
that has not previously been included as an active ingredient in a medicinal
product in respect of which a marketing authorization (other than a product
licence of right) or a traditional herbal registration has previously been granted

Wednesday, October 14, 2009

Winter Detoxification & Remedies


Detoxifying is the process of releasing accumulated toxins and waste products that build up throughout our bobies. Every day we are bombarded by toxins, both externally from environmental sources, and internally as our organs give off waste products that accumulate in our bodies. Emotions also take part in polluting our system with excess chemicals such as free radicals, homocysteine and cortisol.
Detoxifying is essentially an easy process. Our bodies do much of the process through urination, defecation and perspiration. As our bodies age and our immune systems weaken, we sometimes need to lend extra help. That is why conscious detoxing is a great way to get back to optimum health.
One of the best ways to start your detoxification is with the body's biggest organ, the SKIN. A detox diet strengthens the organs involved in detoxification and releases stored toxins, expelling them through the organs of elimination: the skin, intestines, liver, lungs, kidneys, and lymphatic system.
TIPS FOR DETOXING
1. Eat a diet with plenty of fresh vegetables & fruits.
2. Eat whole grains, legumes, nuts and seeds.
3. Adopt a healthy lifestyle including regular exercise.
4. Avoid drugs, alcohol & processed foods.
5. Take a high potency multi vitamin and mineral supplement.
6. Take nutritional and herbal supplements to protect and enhance liver function.
7. Go on a three day fast, four times per year.
8. Fasting at the change of the seasons is a good rule to remember.

MAKE YOUR OWN WINTER REMEDIES Seasonal trends-dropping temperatures, fading light, and your body's dipping defenses-invite all manner of ailments: colds and coughs, flues, and the winter blues. But with a few herbal tinctures, simple yet powerful remedies that you can make yourself, you'll be ready to ward off these ailments and, if they do find a foothold, minimize your discomfort and speed up your recovery.
Tinctures, which are concentrated liquid extracts of medicinal plants, are excellent remedies for wintertime ailments because of their sheer potency. Taken by the dropper-full, they work well, and they work fast. Also called herbal extracts, tinctures have been made for thousands of years by soaking fresh or dried herbs in a solvent, such as vodka or brandy, to extract the plants' medicinal properties. While mass manufacturers use more complicated exacting methods, the traditional technique is simple. It requires only easy-to-find ingredients and common kitchen tools, yet makes some of the most effective tinctures available—for pennies per dose.
Medicinal herbs can be tinctured alone or with other compatible herbs. The herb combinations here are among the most trusted, time-tested remedies. Echinacea, goldenseal, and turmeric make up Super Support, for fending off infections. Cold & Fever Buster contains elder, yarrow, and peppermint to help ease colds and fevers. Cough & Throat Relief features soothing, lung-supportive mullein, licorice, and wild cherry bark, plus ginger for a little kick. Garlic, onion, ginger, cayenne, and horseradish give Fire Tonic its warming, infection fighting kick. And Mood Lifter, for easing seasonal depression, includes hawthorn, oat tops, lemon balm, and St. John's Wort
Whether you make one or all of these recipes, keep in mind the two essential principles of herbal medicine making. 1. Quality ingredients make quality products. If you can't grow your own herbs, buy them from reliable growers or distributors. When choosing your solvent, the medium used to extract and deliver the plants' medicine, choose the best. 2. Just as important, intention matters. Native American healers, who used many of the herbs in these formulas, had a deep reverence for the plants' healing powers. When they dug the plants, they did so with respect and prayer, and when they made them into medicine, they also prayed. Without prayer, they said, the plant's medicine, its essence, stayed in the ground. Among people who use "green medicine" today, there is still a deep sense of respect for the plants. Apply this technique as you gather your herbs and brew your tinctures. Herbal remedies made with clear intention and an appreciation for the plants are much more effective.
SIMPLE TINCTURE MAKING
1. Gather the materials. Keep it simple and make small batches, tinctures are highly concentrated and taken in very small doses—a little goes a long way. To make about a pint of tincture, you'll need a clean, dry, quart-sized jar with a tight-fitting lid, enough herbs to fill the jar halfway, and roughly a pint and a half of solvent (the herbs will soak up some solvent). Most of these formulas call for 100-proof brandy or vodka (use what you prefer). If you prefer not to use alcohol, you can substitute vinegar.
2. Prepare the herbs. If you have any fresh herbs, use them. High-quality dried herbs, however, are just as potent, and available year-round. If you are using fresh herbs, rinse them with water to remove any dirt, dry thoroughly, then chop them finely. Pack your jar halfway with herbs. For a strong, effective tincture, be sure the herbs in the jar are packed firmly.
3. Add the solvent. Pour the solvent over the herbs until they're completely covered, then add an additional 2 to 3 inches of solvent. The herbs must be completely submersed to prevent bacteria from growing (this is also why the fresh washed herbs should be dried before adding to the jar). Cover the jar with a tight fitting lid. Herbs may swell as they soak up the solvent, so you may need to add more solvent to keep the herbs covered. Note: If using vinegar, warm it, do not boil it, on a stovetop before pouring it over the herbs; this helps facilitate the release of medicinal properties.
4. Let the tincture sit for 4 weeks. During the process of soaking the herbs in the solvent, the plants soften and break down (a process known as maceration), releasing their medicine. Most Western herbalists recommend letting tinctures macerate for 4-6 weeks. The longer tinctures macerate, the more effective they are, so consider a month your minimum. When starting the maceration process, label and date your jars so that you remember when you started.
5. Shake daily, with intention. Shaking the tinctures while they're soaking facilitates the breakdown of medicinal properties and prevent the herbs from remaining packed at the bottom of the jar. It's also an opportunity to add some magic to the science of herbal medicine. When you shake your tinctures, do so with your best healing intention. Remain focused and visualize the end result, your remedies will be the better for it.
6. Strain the herbs. After at least 4 weeks, your tincture will be ready for use. Line a stainless-steel strainer with cheesecloth or muslin, and place over a large glass jar or measuring cup. Pour the liquid slowly through the strainer. When finished straining, squeeze the herb-filled cheesecloth or muslin to wring out every drop. Reserve the liquid, this is your medicine, and discard or compost the herbs. Pour the finished tincture into a clean, dry glass jar with a tightly fitting lid. Label your tincture with the contents and date.
7. Store the tincture properly. When stored properly, tinctures can last for years. Both light and heat can break down the medicinal properties, so keep your jars of tinctures in a cool, dark place. It's a good idea to keep a small supply of the tincture ready for use in a 1- or 2-ounce amber-colored bottle with a dropper top.
Dosage and Use varies depending on the individual and the herbs being used. For chronic problems and for remedies you're using as a tonic, the general adult dosage is 1/2 to 1 teaspoon three times daily. For acute ailments, small, frequent doses are much more effective: for adults, 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon every hour. Tinctures can be taken directly under the tounge, however some have a strong flavor, so most people prefer to dilute them in a small amount of water and “shoot” them rather than sip them.

SOLVENTS
The solvent is the liquid used to extract the herbs’ medicinal properties. The solvents used in these recipes have different benfits, however can be interchanged to your preference.

Alcohol extracts most plant constituents, including fats, resins, waxes, and most alkaloids (some of the strongest plant compounds). The body rapidly assimilates alcohol tinctures, and their effects are quickly felt. Alcohol makes an excellent preservative, maintaining the integrity of the tincture for many years. Brandy and vodka are perfect for the traditional tincture method . Both can be purchased at 100 proof, which provides an ideal alcohol-to-water ratio. (Water extracts many important constituents, like vitamins and volatile oils.) For preservative properties and extraction purposes, you must use at least 50-proof alcohol.
Vinegar is completely nontoxic, and well tolerated by most people. While it is not as strong or effective a solvent as alcohol (it does not break down as many plant components), it's a good alternative for alcohol-sensitive people and children. You can easily integrate vinegar tinctures into your daily diet, using them in place of vinegar in cold foods (use apple-cider vinegar if possible). Reports state that vinegar tinctures have a short shelf life, however when stored in a cool, dark place, tightly sealed when not in use, they can last for several years.



WINTERTIME FORMULAS
Note: If you have a serious condition, are pregnant, or take medication, consult your health-care provider before using these or any herbal remedies.
Super Support
Take 1/4- 1/2 tsp. per hour at symptom onset.
Solvent: 100-proof vodka/brandy
2 parts echinaces root, flower and leaf
2 pa1 part turmeric
1 cultivated goldenseal root (Use cultivated goldenseal; this herb has been over-harvested.)
Cold & Fever Buster
Take 1/4-1/2 tsp. per hour at the onset of symptoms.
Solvent: 100-proof vodka/brandy
1 part elder flower and elder berry
1 part peppermint leaf
1 part yarrow flower and leaf
Cough & Throat Relief
Take 1/4- 1/2 tsp. per hour at the onset of symptoms.
Solvent: 100-proof vodka/brandy
2 parts mullein leaf
1 part licorice root
1 part wild cherry bark
1/2 part gingerroot
Fire Tonic
Take 1/4- 1/2 tsp. per hour at the onset of a cold, or as a daily warming tonic. Makes a great salad dressing.
Solvent: apple-cider vinegar
1 part garlic
1 part onion
1/2-1 part freshly grated horseradish
1/2 part ginger small pinch cayenne
honey to taste (add to finished product)
Mood Lifter
To prevent or ease the winter blues, take 1/2 -1 tsp. three times daily.
Solvent: 100-proof vodka/brandy
2 parts hawthorn berry, plus flower and leaf if available
2 parts lemon balm
1 part St. John's wort
1 part milky green oat tops

Winter Herbs, Oils & First Aid


With the first winter chill breezing into town it's time to start thinking about how to keep the sneezes and sniffles away. While there's talk of the value of vitamin C, echinacea and garlic as natural treatments, herbalist claim herbs can prevent colds and flu. There are three main herbs, as well garlic, which are widely used to ward off winter woes. They are Echinacea, andrographis and astrolagus.

Echinacea is effective for the early treatment of colds and flu because it's an immune stimulant but is best taken before a cold sets in, however, it can help shorten the duration of flu if you take it once you've become ill and can assist with treating respiratory infections.
Andrographis and Astrolagus work in much the same way. Andrographis is also used for coughs and sore throats. These herbs are highly effective alone or in conjunction.
The frequent use of Garlic, referred to as nature's antibiotic, puts you well on your way to preventing a winter cold.
And don’t forget your vitamin C. Citrus, grapes and strawberries are high in C, and it doesn’t hurt to add zinc from beans, nuts and whole grains.
You may wish to try this herbal remedy, shared by a friend who swears by it. She hasn’t had a cold/flu in years.

Total Tonic Formula
1 Handful of split Garlic cloves
1 Handful of chopped Onions
1 Handful of chopped Ginger
1 Handful of chopped Horseradish
1/2 handful of chopped Habanero Peppers.

Throw it all in a blender and chop, then cover with
an inch or two of Organic Apple Cider Vinegar.
Let tincture for a week or two (shake now and then)
and strain, then drink a little of the juice daily,
or twice daily. (It is very HOT)
A small amount in V8 Juice is good and Turmeric can be added for extra benefit.

Winter Herbal Medicine Chest
Several herbs are effective for treating not only the symptoms of too much winter, but also the causes of colds and flu… Impaired immunity to virus/bacteria, maintaining blood circulation and warmth, ensuring vitality of the lungs and reducing the build up of congestion in the body. In addition to the herbs already mentioned, some herbs to keep on hand in your “medicine chest” are:
Ginger, Elderflower, Yarrow, Sage, Rose Hips, Mullein, Thyme, Fenugreek & Marshmallow. Other beneficial ingredients to your chest would be
Winter Essential Oils
Aromatherapy brings us the aromatic energy of living plants in the form of essential oils. These fragrances are a natural antidote to the emotionally debilitating effects of winter. Winter essential oils cleanse and freshen air in homes closed tight against the cold weather and can be beneficial in treating winter ailments. Some useful winter oils are:Bergamot, Black Pepper, Eucalyptus, Juniper Berry, Lemon, Orange, Rosemary & Tea Tree.
Try these Essential Oil remedies in a massage, a bath, infused in the air or in a “sniffy” bottle. In all of them combine the oils listed
WINTER WARMTH BLEND
10 drops of cedar wood
25 drops of bergamot orange
15 drops of fir needle
30 drops of juniper berry
20 drops of sandalwood
SINUS CONGESTION BLEND
5 drops of Eucalyptus
3 drops of Lavender
2 drops of Tea-Tree
2 drops of Pine.
PICK ME UP BLEND
7 drops of Bergamot
5 drops of Grapefruit
3 drops of Rosemary
SUNSHINE BLEND
5 drops of Lemon
5 drops of Orange
3 drops of Geranium
2 drops of Peppermint

Sunday, September 13, 2009

The Alaska Local Food Film Festival

Mark Your Calendars!
Great Movies Oct 2-8th, 2009

Join Alaska Center for the Environment, the Beartooth Theatrepub & Grill, Delicious Dave Catering, AK Root Sellers, NOLS, and Bioneers Alaska for the first Alaska Local Food Film Festival! The festival will take place October 2nd-8th at the Beartooth Theatrepub in Anchorage, and will feature the Alaska debut of Food Inc, as well as the films The Garden, Eating Alaska, FRESH, and The End of the Line. There will be opportunities to eat fresh Alaskan food and discuss the films, as well as to learn more about how you can get involved with the Alaska local food movement.

The Beartooth Grill will be preparing specials made with local ingredients brought in by AK Root Sellers from the Valley. Ellen Frankenstein, filmmaker and feature of Eating Alaska, will be in town to answer questions after screening her film, and Dave Thorne of Delicious Dave Catering along with Kathy Ciarimboli brings you FRESH the movie with an opportunity for discussion after the film. There will be plenty of opportunities to ask questions and learn more about how you can get involved with the Alaska local food movement! Additionally, Bioneers Alaska will host a dessert, coffee, and Q&A opportunity on the last night of the Film Fest, Thursday 10/8th - stay tuned for details!

========Clip and post this film schedule======

10/2 - 5:30 - FOOD, INC.

10/3 - 5:30 - THE GARDEN

10/4 - 5:30 - EATING ALASKA with discussion w/filmmaker Ellen Frankenstein after the film

10/5 - 5:30 - FRESH with discussion after the film

10/5 - 8:00 - END OF THE LINE

10/6 - 5:30 - THE GARDEN

10/7 - 5:30 - END OF THE LINE

10/8 - 5:30 - FOOD, INC.

These are exciting and well worth coming out for!

Thanks to Alaska Center for the Environment for this bulletin and support.

Harvest blessings, and let me know if you want off the list,

Ellen Vande Visse
Good Earth Garden School
www.goodearthgardenschool.com

Sunday, July 12, 2009

Retirement

IT'S A TOUGH JOB, BUT SOMEONES GOTTA DO IT!

Friday, July 10, 2009

Melon Panzanella


Makes 6 servings, about 1 cup each

4 ounces whole-grain bread, torn into bite-size pieces (about 2 ½ cups)
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 ounce thinly sliced prosciutto, cut into thin strips (about ⅓ cup)
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons red-wine vinegar
¼ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
4 cups torn arugula leaves
2 cups cubed firm ripe melon
2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil

1. Preheat oven to 250°F.
2. Spread bread pieces on a baking sheet. Bake until lightly toasted, about 20 minutes.
3. Meanwhile, heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add prosciutto and cook, stirring occasionally, until crisp, 3 to 4 minutes. Add garlic and cook, stirring, 30 seconds more. Remove from the heat and stir in vinegar, salt and pepper.
4. Place arugula, melon, basil and the toasted bread in a large bowl. Add the prosciutto mixture and toss to combine. Let the salad stand for about 20 minutes before serving so the bread can absorb some of the dressing.

Cantalope Ice Pops


Makes eight 2-ounce pops
Equipment: 8 popsicle molds or small (2-ounce) paper cups

1 small cantaloupe
½ cup water
¼ cup sugar
1 tablespoon finely slivered fresh mint leaves
¼-⅓ cup lemon juice, depending on the sweetness of the melon

1. Cut cantaloupe in half; remove and discard the seeds. Scoop out the flesh and transfer to a food processor. Puree until smooth; measure 1 1/3 cups puree and transfer to a small bowl. (Reserve any remaining puree for another use, such as a smoothie.)
2. Pour water into a small saucepan, add sugar and bring to a boil over high heat. Stir in mint and immediately remove from the heat. Let stand for 1 minute.
3. Stir the mint syrup and lemon juice into the cantaloupe puree. Pour the mixture into 8 individual popsicle molds or small (2-ounce) paper cups.
4. Freeze until beginning to set, about 1 hour. Insert frozen-treat sticks and freeze until completely firm. Dip the molds briefly in hot water before unmolding

Friday, July 3, 2009

Dance Like A Duck!

Daily Love Fest



Actually, everyone is reasonable.
They just have their own reasons.

And usually it's worth trying to learn what
they are to maximize chances of a full-blown,
60's style, psychedelic lovefest.
Which is always a good thing.

Groovy you,
The Universe
www.tut.com
If each of us strives everyday to understand someone else, someone outside our comfort zones, our friend & family circles, our culture, our race, our neighborhoods....We are one step closer and ever advancing to World Peace, Harmony & Joy! Love your fellow man, even if he is not related to you.
MM

Sunday, June 28, 2009

TEA


When I drink tea
I am conscious of peace
The cool breath of Heaven
rises in my sleeves, and
blows my cares away

Chincese Poet Lotung

Saturday, June 27, 2009

Summer Solstice: Seasonal simmers


Good Morning!
Simmers are a special mixture of herbs and spices, which are combined
into a blend or potion, created to bring the power of aromatherapy
and intention into your life. They are also designed to capture the
attention of those around you.

Based on folk remedies, grandma's recipes and the ingredients
provided by nature, these simmers are recipes used to make your
kitchen smell delightful. They can be used along with a "special
intention" and later, can even be enjoyed as tea!



Summer Simmer

Used for: scenting the kitchen/any room with aromatherapy, inviting
Summer, honoring the Solstice, invoking Summer love, as a cooling
iced tea.

-Blend 2-4 quartz of water with:
-1 lemon, sliced
-1 lime, sliced
-sprig of mint
-1 tsp. vanilla
-4-6 tsp. of two of the following herbs: Jasmine flower, Chamomile
flower, Chrysanthemum flower, Rose petals.


Slowly simmer on the stove. Allow the smell to permeate the room.
Cool and refrigerate for iced tea.




Peppermint Simmer

Used for: scenting any room with aromatherapy, creating a cooling
iced tea or used as a insect repellant.

-Blend 2-4 quartz of water with:
-15 - 20 peppermint or spearmint leaves
-1 orange, sliced
-two drops of peppermint, spearmint or wintergreen essential oil

Slowly simmer on the stove. Allow the smell to permeate the room.
Cool and refrigerate for iced tea.




Special Notes:

With each simmer you can:
-take advantage of their aromatic properties.
-say a positive affirmation, invoking words, a special prayer or give
thanks.
-use them at the start of each season to give honor to yourself and
your intentions for that season.
-as it cools, share, drink, these simmers as a tea.
-the health properties of these ingredients are appropriate for each
season, relate to the internal organs and are associated by taste,
temperature and color.


Andrew Pacholyk, MS, L.Ac
http://www.peacefulmind.com
Therapies for healing
mind, body, spirit

Thursday, June 25, 2009


TO: Andrew Pacholyk, MS, L.Ac.
http://www.peaceful mind.com
Therapies for healing mind, body, spirit
For sharing all of his wonderful knowledge so freely!

Summer Crystal Reiki Grids


Good Morning!
Many Healers are called to facilitate 'distance' energy sessions for
people that do not have access to in-person care. Often, this
includes seriously ill clients/friends/ family that could use Reiki or
healing energy each and every day. Distance energy work in the
same way as sending a 'prayer'. A prayer is energy that transcends
time/space to interact with a situation/person/ event. The
requirement for any distance energy to be effective is a strong,
concentrated intent from the person sending the energy/prayer.
This includes Reiki work and all other forms of 'sending energy'
across a distance.

There are many props that can be used to assist us in 'sending' our
healing energy in a coherent and concentrated manner. First, we
must adequately establish a connection with the receiving person.
Photo's, personal items, or a previous meeting with the receiving
person (ie, someone we already know) are usually the best ways
to connect. Second, many Healers find it very useful to facilitate a
full session on a proxy... like a stuffed animal, with the other items
(if they are available) close by.

You may also want to create a grid for the season's solstice. This
grid allows for the purification of the energy around you in your
home, office, meditation space or garden! Creating your own grid
with your crystals is a personal and balancing way of manifesting
good energy for a good season! There are many combinations you can
create! Here is one suggestion:

Evoking the Element of summer, which is fire, make a space that is
for your crystal grid. This should be in the south direction of your
home, garden, meditation space or office. Use a fire stone in the
center of your grid such as garnet, ruby or red spinel. Evoke the
other seasons and directions by placing 4 crystal quartz points
around the center red stone with the points facing away from the
center. in between the 4 quartz points you may put 4 complementary
color to red, which is green (such as jade, aventurine or peridot).
Bless the grid with incenses, herbal sage or sweet grass or simply a
prayer for a bountiful harvest (which is surely a metaphysical
metaphor for our lives) and then allow the grid to do its work.

Working with Reiki Energy

Many Reiki Practitioners and Energy Workers add the
subtle vibrations of stone energy as a complement to their
healing sessions or daily lives. Usually this includes the
laying on of the appropriate colored stones to coordinate
with the Chakra centers, meditating with a particular
stone, or wearing the stones as jewelry when the
inspiration hits. There are, however, even more uses when
stones are set up in a 'Grid' and are properly 'activated'.

A 'Grid' is more simply put, a way to arrange the stones in
a sacred geometric pattern. They are then consciously
'activated' by connecting a 'line of Light' between the
stones so that they radiate an energy field in the immediate
environment in which they are constructed. Those of you
who are sensitive to energy will be able to tell immediately
that there is a shift of energy in the room where you
construct a Grid. Depending on which stones you choose,
there will either be a gentle shift... or a very tangible one.

Creating a Sacred Space:

We live and work in a variety of environments. Many of these
environments have a specific function to fulfill that can be
consciously and energetically supported. The current attention on
Feng Shui and similar 'getting the energy in the room just right'
techniques have shown that we, as a society, are becoming more
aware of how our immediate spaces can either be harmonious or
disharmonious to our goals. Constructing a Crystalline Grid in an
environment that supports the function of the room is yet another
way to contribute to the overall energy flow.

Most people wish to create a Sacred Space in personal rooms;
such as, Healing, Meditation, and even Bedrooms. Healing rooms
should be warm, inviting, supportive, loving, and full of Light
(Selenite, Rose Quartz, Turquoise, Crystal Points, etc.). Meditation
rooms should be soothing with an added emphasis on reaching
high vibrational states of consciousness (Amethyst, Azurite,
Moldavite, Angelite, Celestite, Selenite, Crystal Points). Bedrooms
are the alchemical combination of dreamtime, regeneration, and
(hopefully) intimate bliss (Herkimer Diamond, Rose Quartz,
Garnet, Lapis, Azurite, etc.). These are all examples of rooms one
might wish to support with appropriate Crystalline Grids... but
certainly not the only kind.

There are other spaces that can be supported by a general 'vibe'...
such as living rooms, children's spaces, offices and workspaces,
etc. In a living room, one may wish to add a Grid that supports
harmony of a group or general feelings of Love and Comfort
(Crystal Clusters, Rose Quartz). A Grid in a Child's space might
include nurturing, creative, and joyful energies (Moonstone,
Citrine, Rose Quartz, Kyanite). An office Grid might include
harmony of a group, calmness, grounding, and shielding (Crystal
Clusters, Amethyst, Black Tourmaline, etc.).

There are no right and wrongs.... you choose the space, you
choose the Crystalline Grid to support it the way your intuition
guides you. Familiarizing yourself with the various metaphysical
properties of minerals can be very helpful to you as you make your
choices. You can get a nice list of stones you may want to use and
then use a pendulum to figure out which ones would be the most
effective for you.

The Star of David Pattern

Place quartz crystal points under our massage table in a pattern
called the Star of David layout. For this, place crystals on the
points of an imaginary Star of David: one each below the head and
foot, one each below the shoulders and hips.

This layout creates a very stable and relaxing energy pattern which
seals in the Reiki energy. We also recommend it for meditation.

There are many possible variations to this pattern. Amethyst or
citrine may be used instead of quartz, and the points may be
alternated with stones of another kind (rose quartz for a love grid,
aventurine for healing, aquamarine for creativity, hematite for
psychic protection).

Hands On
Often clients enjoy holding a crystal in one or both hands during the
treatment. You can either let them choose the one(s) to which they
are attracted, or make suggestions, such as:

For grounding issues: hematite, tiger's eye, black tourmaline, red
jasper, smoky quartz

Anxiety/nervousness : amethyst, rhodochrosite, aquamarine

Love issues: rose quartz (for relationship issues); emerald, for
feeling cut off from divine love or one's spirituality

Opening up spirituality: clear quartz, chrysocolla, amethyst

Spiritual Teaching Grid
(suggested by Zoe Lan)

For my grid I use stones which I purchased specifically for the grid.
They happen to be phantom amethyst raw chunks from Africa. I have
this great shallow bowl which I have filled with sand which I
reikied, and then I program each crystal to sit *proxy* for a person
or a situation. I then arrange them in any formation I wish.
Often, I will put a crystal in my grid representing a spiritual
teacher - Sai Baba, the Dalai Lama, Sri Ganapathi - others who I
consider avatars or great teachers who I feel are able to also focus
grace into my grid. For our circle, I begin by washing all the
crystals I have at my disposal. It is quite a ritual for me since I
just enjoy that sort of thing. I often prepare myself by taking a sea
salt and soda bath.

I invite my reiki guides and any other beings who have the permission
of my higher self to come and assist me. I then *ask* the pile of
clean crystal *beings* who would like to sit proxy for so-and-so.
Invariably, one of them speaks up or I perceive a light from them. I
then program that crystal just as one might program a piece of paper
for distancing reiki. I state the name and the request and I place it
in the grid and move on to the next one.

Then program the entire grid itself stating that by the law of
correspondence, whenever I reiki the grid that the people the
crystals are sitting proxy for will receive a complete reiki
treatment. During our circle I spend much more time and individually
connect with each crystal since I put them in an order and know who
is who. But in between circles, I reiki my grid as a whole. I find it
also easy to add crystals as the need arises...more requests in
between etc.

For me, it is sort of a mini-medicine circle or my personal
stonehenge! It is also like walking a labyrinth in a way since I work
my way with the energy step by step.

I top off my grid with a gold-plated pyramid which surrounds the grid
and creates a standing columnar wave...I find it very powerful to
reiki right over the apex and I am also able to perceive that the
sacred geometry shape has an effect as well being over them. I am
also into pyramid energy so have thrown that into the mix because it
works for me!

Healer's Energy Grid
(suggested by Laura Kuaffman)

The first thing to do is develop clear intent of the purpose of your
grid. It is best to start with a grid to help you with your distant
healing, then if you want you can move on to grids for specific
projects or situations.

Do a prayer of intent that you wish to the perfect grid to assist you
in your distant healing work, and be guided to select the right
crystals for it.

It is best to use single terminated quartz or quartz-like for the 6
outer crystals (unless you receive strong guidance to use something
else). They can be any color of quartz or quartz-like i.e. clear,
rose, amethyst points, citrine, etc.

For the central crystal select something "special" i.e. a cluster, a
sphere, a pyramid or just something particularly meaningful to you.

Then you need a crystal that feels powerful and strong to you for
your master crystal. I feel that a crystal that is a blend of
masculine and feminine energies is most powerful for me. i.e. it is
very clear in areas and cloudy and filled with inclusions in other
areas. It will probably be slightly larger than the 6 outer crystals.

Allow a couple hours to create this tool the first time. It deserves
a sacred space in your life and is very worth the time. After it is
created it only takes a few minutes each day to maintain the energy

Preparing the Crystal Grid

-Cleanse the crystals
-Hold them one at a time and put all the Reiki symbols in them,
intending to charge them and asking them to serve as channels for the
Reiki energy. This can take anywhere from 5-15 minutes per crystal
depending on your guidance
-Place them in formation. ( uses a Star of David Pattern with a
cluster or other special crystal in the center.)
Then take your master crystal in your hands and pray to have the full
power of the Reiki energy flow through you as you empower your grid
to heal with love and light. Create an affirmation to do this
something like:

"I empower this grid to heal, to heal, to heal, with love, with love,
with love, with light, with light, with light".

repeat this three times as you connect the grid lines moving counterclockwise around the grid.

To connect the grid lines start by pointing the master crystal toward
the central crystal holding it a few inches above the grid . . . when
you feel the energy flow move the master crystal up to the crystal at
the top of the grid drawing a line of energy, then move diagonally to
the crystal on the left, then back to the center, then retrace the
line you just drew, then move to the next crystal on the left. Go
back to center and then retrace that line you just drew, then
continue around the grid as you say your affirmation.
It actually looks kind of like you are cutting a pie, except you are
retracing each line from the center back out. When you feel that you
are finished come back to the top crystal and then move to the
central crystal . . . let the final burst of Reiki flow into the
central crystal. You can then draw a power symbol over it if you
want, intending that you are increasing the power of the grid.
(connecting the lines and affirming the healing power is done daily
to keep the grid active 24 hours a day)

Next you just need to link the names of the people you want to send
Reiki to or the situations. I have my grid on a table that has a
drawer. The grid is on top and the names are in the drawer. You can
also can put a bowl under a table or simply keep a bowl or basket
with pieces of paper with the people's names on it near the grid and
intend that it is linked to the grid.

For crystal healing in person:
The crystals and stones can be placed:
-Upon the subject in a grid or pattern.
-Be extra careful when placing crystals or stones in particularly
sensitive areas such as eyelids.
-You can use a pre-planned grid or pattern, or place the stones on the
chakras, or use your intuition to access healing information from the
-Divine and use a pattern of your own devising.

Below the subject.
-Again, you can use pre-planned grids or patterns or use your intuition.
-Be careful of accidentally causing stone bruises, and pad the stones
if necessary when placing them under the healee.

Around him or her.
-Near or touching the body in a pattern around the healee can work
well for healing. You can effectively make the healee part of the
pattern in this way.

For long distance healing:
You can use a substitute to stand in for the actual healee who is at
a distance from you. A photograph of the healee is a great
substitute, however, if no photo is available, writing down their
name and using that is good also.

For ritual magick:
After preparing for your magickal ceremony, use the stones to help
focus the energy of your ritual magick, or as specified in the spell
or charm you are working with.

See our Stone and Crystal community files for great Reiki Grids!
http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/StonesandC rystals/files/

Andrew Pacholyk, MS, L.Ac.
http://www.peaceful mind.com/ specialties. htm
Alternative medicine and therapies
for healing mind, body & spirit!

Wednesday, June 24, 2009

Summer Solstice Week: De-Cluttering, Cleansing and Feng Shui


Good Morning!

1. Cleansing the Body
This is one of three processes that should be done 4 times a year.
Using the seasons as a guide, allows us to work with the "flow of
nature" and change as our bodies change. Consider a healthy detox or
work with the power of an herbal cleanser.
Here is a nice Detoxification Bath to get you started:

Detoxification Bath
2 Cups Sea Salt
2 Cups Baking Soda
4 Tbsp. Ginger Powder
Place all ingredients in a hot bath and bathe for 20 Minutes
Drink plenty of water. This bath withdraws impurities from your body
and helps you to feel better. This bath can be done
2 to 3 times in a week or as needed.

Psyllium is a bulk-forming laxative and is high in both fiber and
mucilage. Psyllium seeds contain 10-30% mucilage. The laxative
properties of psyllium are due to the swelling of the husk when it
comes in contact with water. This forms a gelatinous mass and keeps
the feces hydrated and soft. The resulting bulk stimulates a reflex
contraction of the walls of the bowel, followed by emptying.

De-cluttering the space around you can make all the difference in the
way you feel. Start small. Try organizing a drawer or desk, your
closet or one room in your house, first. Then move on to a bigger
project. Learn the secrets to de-cluttering and re-organizing your
life with the proponents of Feng Shui

2. Cleansing the Mind
This is the 2nd in the trilogy. Learn how to think in "affirmations"
that are positive! These are statements that you make either aloud or
to yourself. Always approve and accept yourself. You cannot love
yourself unless you first, approve of and accept yourself.

A disciplined mind is a free mind. Gain control over your thoughts
and you maintain control over your life. Retrain your mind and you
regain your freedom. Calming the mind is a behavioral technique used
to interrupt, minimize and eliminate "psychological noise".
Obsessive, repetitive thoughts, anxiety and fears are all apart of
negative, self-destructive patterns that can benefit from the
positive affirmations and mind quieting.

"Love Thy Self"
I am perfect, whole and complete NOW, the way I am.
I deserve all that I require.
I am worthy, loveable and strong.

3. Cleansing the Spirit
This is a life long lesson and third in the trilogy. Utilize the
strength of yoga therapy. What is your belief system ? Does it serve
you well? How about discovering some great meditations !
The Sun Salutation in yoga is a great wakening and cleansing
exercise. This is a flowing combination of some of the asanas in
hatha yoga.

Sun Salutation
Stand in Tadasana, take a deep breath, clasp thumbs in front of you
and raise arms in front of you over head. Arch back from the waist.
Now, fold over at the waist as you exhale, placing palms on the
floor, Uttanasana, step your right leg back into Lunge, step your
left leg back to Plank, come into Bhujangasana, flow into Adho Mukha
Svanasana, step your right foot forward to Lunge, left foot forward
for Uttanasana, inhale up to Tadasana. Repeat, stepping your left leg
back into Lunge.

Sun Salutation can be found at:
http://www.peaceful mind.com/ yoga_therapy. htm

Cleansing Meditation

Breath is life! Exchange of electrons. Flow of energy. Air is the
primary nutrient. Survival without it is measured in minutes. It is
so important that you do it without thinking. Your breathing is the
voice of your spirit. It's depth, smoothness, sound, and rate reflect
your mood. If you become aware of your breath and breathe the way you
do when you are calm you will become calm. Practicing regular,
mindful breathing can be calming and energizing. With the addition of
music and it's rhythm, the "musical breath" can even help stress-
related health problems ranging from panic attacks to digestive
disorders. Fall into the rhythm of the music and breathe. Focus on
your breathing and the music.

Focusing on the breath is one of the most common and fundamental
techniques for accessing the meditative state. Breath is a deep
rhythm of the body that connects us intimately with the world around
us.

Close your eyes, breathe deeply and regularly, and observe your
breath as it flows in and out of your body. Give your full attention
to the breath as it comes in, and full attention to the breath as it
goes out. Whenever you find your attention wandering away from your
breath, gently pull it back to the rising and falling of the breath.
Inhale through your nose slowly and deeply, feeling the lower chest
and abdomen inflate like a balloon. Hold for five seconds. Exhale
deeply, deflating the lower chest and abdomen like a balloon. Hold
for five seconds. Do this three or four times, then allow your
breathing to return to a normal rhythm. You will begin to feel a
change come over your entire body. Gradually you will become less
aware of your breathing, but not captured in your stream of thoughts.
You will become more centered inward. You will just "be there."

Feng Shui for summer can be a great experience. For more Feng Shui
tips:

http://www.peaceful mind.com/ feng_shui. htm

Seasonal Healing is one of the best ways to remind ourselves that it
is time to evaluate our health. Our moods and bodies change as the
seasons change. See more on seasonal healing:

http://www.peaceful mind.com/ seasonal. htm

Andrew Pacholyk, MS, L.Ac.
http://www.peaceful mind.com
Therapies for healing
mind, body, spirit

Summer Solstice Week: Summer Essential Oils


Good Morning!

Summer is a time of full growth, red, hot, joy, spiritual awareness
and traveling. Life is at it's greatest potential in the summer.
Trees, plants, grasses and seeds are now at their full peak offering
up the "fruits of their labor"! Take a minute to enjoy this most Yang
time of energy and production! These essential oils are great for
your first aid kit, as insect repellent, for soothing sunburn,
freshening and cleaning! Enjoy these soothing scents for relaxing and
letting go.

Tea Tree:
antiseptic, antiviral, antibacterial, antibiotic, antifungal,
expectorant, insecticide, cicatrisant (wound healer), etc.
infections, ringworm, athlete's foot
sunburn
shaving and other cuts
warts, pimples, etc. May irritate sensitive skin.

Lavender:
antiseptic, antibiotic, antidepressant, antispasmodic, diuretic,
analgesic, nervine, immune stimulant, sedative. antiviral,
carminative, decongestant, fungicide
burns and blisters
wounds (cell regenerator, minismizes swelling and scarring)
insect bites. stings
heat exhaustion, Avoid during the first trimester of preganancy

Peppermint:
digestive, carminative, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, febrifuge,
nervine, analgesic, astringent, decongestant. expectorant, stomachic,
vermifuge
indigestion, flatulence, halitosis
skin irritations
flu, colds, coughs, fever
headaches, migraines
fatigue, toothache
flea and ant repellant May irritate sensitive skin and mucous
membranes. Avoid during pregnancy and while nursing. May antidote
homeopathic remedies.

Eucalyptus:
vulnerary, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antibiotic, diuretic,
insecticide, stimulant, analgesic, antiviral, decongestant,
expectorant, febrifuge
coughs, colds
cystitis
sunburn, heat exhaustion
insect repellant Avoid if you have high blood pressure or epilepsy.
May antidote homeopathic remedies.

Citronella:
antiseptic, antidepressant, deodorant, insecticide, stimulant,
parasiticide
bug repellent (mosquitos, moths, fleas)
to refresh tired and sweaty feet after exercise
germ killer

Chamomile :
antibacterial, antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, diuretic,
sedative, anti-allergenic, antidepressant, stomachic, vulnerary,
antiemetic, carminative. digestive, febrifuge, nervine
external inflammations
teething
nervousness, irritability, depression
burns, sunburns
asthma, hayfever
sprains, strains
nausea, fever Avoid during the first trimester of pregnancy.

Clove:
antiemetic, antibacterial, antiseptic, analgesic, carminative,
insecticide, stimulant, stomachic
toothach
digestive problems, nausea
sinusitis Skin irritant. Do not use in massage

Rosemary:
antiseptic. analgesic, antirheumatic. antispasmodic, antidepressant.
astringent. carminnive. cicatrisant. digestive, diuretic. stimulant.
vulnerary, stomachic, nervine, etc.
muscular aches and pains
sprains
fatigue (mental and physical)
headaches, migraines
coughs, flu

Seasonal Healing is one of the best ways to remind ourselves that it
is time to evaluate our health. Our moods and bodies change as the
seasons change. See more on seasonal healing:

http://www.peaceful mind.com/ seasonal. htm

Andrew Pacholyk, MS, L.Ac.
http://www.peaceful mind.com/ oils.htm
Therapies for healing
mind, body, spirit

Friday, June 19, 2009


GEG Bulletin June 18, 2009
Worm into this Class!

Worm-crazy Ellen will hold forth about

WORMS & WORM COMPOSTING

Definitely try this at home!

O boy O boy!

How can you pass this up?
Even Lowly the Worm will be there

Wriggle into a seat and learn about:
Worm bins purchased or home-made
Setting up your bin
What kind of worms will work?
What to feed them?
What to do if…
How to harvest the compost

Date: Tuesday July 7

Time: 6:30-8:30pm

Place: VCRS (Valley Community for Recycling Solutions) on Palmer-Wasilla Highway

Tuition $10

Instructor: Ellen Vande Visse, Good Earth Garden School

Sign up to reserve a place (seating is limited unless you are very skinny): information@goodearthgardenschool.com or 745 0758

Ellen Vande Visse
Good Earth Garden School
www.goodearthgardenschool.com